Affiliated Faculty

IUNI has over 165 faculty affiliates from across IU. You may browse through listings below – clicking on a name will expand to show you full listings. You may also search through keywords and biographies in the search bar below.

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A - E
Beer, Randall Cognitive Science Program, College of Arts and Science / IUB
F - J
Hood, Sula Social and Behavioral Sciences, Richard M, Fairbanks School of Public Health / IUPUI
Bio: Dr. Hood’s research agenda has a strong emphasis on addressing chronic disease health disparities, where she conducts research to inform the development of health promotion programs to improve the health and quality of life of disadvantaged populations. In particular, her research seeks to identify mechanisms and test ways of intervening to increase social support and health communication as critical strategies for promoting chronic disease prevention, coping, and self-management. Dr. Hood values multidisciplinary research approaches, and has worked in teams to develop and test innovative community-based health promotion interventions in unique settings such as barbershops and family reunions. Her research utilizes mixed-methods, incorporating both qualitative and quantitative methodology.
José, Jorge V. Physics, Stark Neurosciences Institute, College of Arts and Sciences, School of Medicine / Bloomington
Bio: The research in my lab goes from computational neuroscience studies of neurons and neuronal networks modeling animal behaviors to studies in humans affected by neurological disorders, including translational research applications. All research done in my lab is guided by a general principle of connecting neuronal dynamics to behavior. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is characterized by the lack of communicative and cognitive abilities. The current clinical diagnostic models have focused almost exclusively on the deficits providing qualitative behavioral treatments to improve the individual’s condition. In collaboration with Rutgers University and members of the Indiana University School of Medicine, we have been thinking about autism in a very different way. Recent technical advances in wearable sensing technology have helped us bridge the gap between observational clinical practices and quantitative objective research outcomes. The instruments we used in our laboratory settings allow motion tracking kinematics for different parts of the body, including the eyes’ minute motions, facial micro-expressions and body micro-movements. To analyze the “big data sets” produced by these recordings we developed new statistical analytics. Our analyses provide novel physiologically biometrics which may be used to characterizing sensory-motor signatures many which occur largely beneath detection of our naked eye capabilities. Our recent results offer new avenues for connecting the cognitive abilities of individuals by quantitatively studying their moment-by-moment natural micro-movements at a millisecond time scales. Synchronization of inhibitory neurons as a possible mechanism for attentional gain modulation. Naturally occurring visual scenes contain large amounts of spatial and temporal information that are transduced into neuronal spike trains along the visual sensory pathway. Human psychophysics indicates that only a small part of that information is attended. We have developed Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal models to analyze data obtained from electrophysiological experiments with nonhuman primates. We have suggested that attentional modulation of the synchrony of local interneuronal networks could potentially account for these observations. We also considered the case when two stimuli are presented simultaneously. The neuronal response is in between those for each stimulus presented separately (stimulus competition) and when one stimulus is attended. The neuronal response gets closer to the response to this stimulus presented alone (biased competition). When the stimulus contrast is varied, several types of gain responses have been found with attention. We introduced a biophysical neural network model of V4, constraining it to reproduce the dynamics observed in the absence of attention. We were able to reproduce some of the detailed neural activity reported experimentally and the stimulus competition. We are exploring the possibility that our model may provide a unified framework for attentional modulation in V4. From neuronal to an hydrodynamic model describing larvae zebra fish rich swimming repertoire. Larval zebrafish (LZF) provide a unique opportunity to study realistic neuronal models since the fish is transparent and most of its neuronal properties are measured. The LZF exhibits a variety of complex undulatory swimming patterns. This repertoire is controlled by the 300 neurons projecting from brain into spinal cord. We developed a segmental oscillator model (using the NEURON program) to investigate this system. By adjusting NMDA strengths and glycinergic synapses produced the generation of oscillation (tail-beat) frequency patterns over the range exhibited experimentally. To describe visually the experimentally observed bending patterns we also developed a biomechanical-hydrodynamic model to better understand how those outputs are generated by the neuronal model we developed.
K - O
Macklin, Paul Intelligent Systems Engineering, School of Informatics and Computing / Bloomington
Bio: I work in the newly-formed Department of Intelligent Systems Engineering, where I am helping to start the bioengineering track. My work involves developing sophisticated, multiscale models of tissues and organisms that show dynamical cross-talk and feedbacks between networks at multiple scales: genetics, epigenetics, RNA transcription, protein dynamics, cell phenotype, cell and tissue mechanics, multicellular communications through chemical and mechanical signals, tissue remodeling, networked physiologic subsystems (e.g., immune system, cardiovascular system, etc.), organism-scale health/behavior, and the epidemiologic scale that emerges from the distribution of individual traits. Most of my prior work has focused on cancer and tissue biology, and I am now expanding to other areas such as cognitive health. I have developed and maintain several open source packages for simulation investigations of these dynamical multiscale systems, and I also lead an international group in creating a data standard / data model for these problems.
Maupome, Gerardo Department of Cariology, Operative Dentistry and Dental Public Health, School of Dentistry / IUPUI
Bio: Gerardo Maupomé is an oral health researcher with primary interests in dental health services research and oral epidemiology, oral treatment needs among patients at high risk of disease or subject to health and social disparities, and analysis of professional practices – including how dental professionals make therapeutic decisions. He has worked in the private sector and in academia for the past 25 years. He is a Professor with Indiana University School of Dentistry since 2005, and currently has various affiliations with academic organizations in the USA (including IUNI) and in the UK. Dr. Maupomé has been involved in various research projects – spanning from epidemiological studies assessing the impact of public health fluoridation, to clinical trials of chlorhexidine varnishes; from community demonstrations to promote healthier lifestyle decisions, to quantitative appraisals of factors contributing to poor oral health and failure to access dental services; and from qualitative investigations into social and economic determinants of health, to economic analyses of the costs implied in health conditions and associated therapeutic procedures. Some of these studies have been focused on American Indians, people of Mexican and Hispanic origin, those 65 years of age and older, children, and population groups with restricted access to dental services.
Disciplines: Dentistry
Menczer, Filippo Informatics and Computer Science, School of Informatics and Computing / IUB
Bio: Filippo Menczer is a Professor of informatics and computer science, adjunct Professor of physics, and a member of the cognitive science program at Indiana University, Bloomington. He holds a Laurea in Physics from the University of Rome and a Ph.D. in Computer Science and Cognitive Science from the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Menczer has been the recipient of Fulbright, Rotary Foundation, and NATO fellowships, and a Career Award from the National Science Foundation. He currently serves as director of the Center for Complex Networks and Systems Research and is a Fellow of the Institute for Scientific Interchange Foundation in Torino, Italy, a Senior Research Fellow of The Kinsey Institute, and an ACM Distinguished Scientist. He previously served as division chair in the IUB School of Informatics and Computing, and was Fellow-at-large of the Santa Fe Institute. His research is supported by the NSF, DARPA, and the McDonnell Foundation. It focuses on Web science, social networks, social media, social computation, Web mining, distributed and intelligent Web applications, and modeling of complex information networks.
Disciplines: Computer Science
Newman, Ehren Dept of Psychological and Brain Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences / IUB
P - T
Perry, Brea Sociology, College of Arts and Sciences / IUB
Bio: Brea Perry is an Associate Professor of Sociology at Indiana University, and received a Ph.D. in Sociology from IU in 2008. Prior to returning to Indiana in 2014, she was an Associate Professor at the University of Kentucky, where she founded and directed the interdisciplinary Health, Society, and Populations Program. Her research and teaching interests include social networks, medical sociology, mental illness, biosociology, social genetics, and quantitative methodology. One line of research focuses on complex interactions between genotypes, social statuses, and social environmental conditions (GxExE) in substance use pathways. Dr. Perry also studies personal social network dynamics and processes that accompany progression through illness careers. Much of her work employs egocentric social network analysis and multilevel and longitudinal modeling. Dr. Perry’s research has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the Spencer Foundation, and the McManus Foundation. She is currently the series editor of Advances in Medical Sociology.
Disciplines: Sociology
Pullen, Erin L. IU Network Science Institute / IUB
Bio: Erin Pullen is an Assistant Research Scientist at the Indiana University Network Science Institute. She came to Indiana University in 2015 after completing her PhD at the University of Kentucky. Her primary research interests include egocentric networks, medical sociology, health disparities, and quantitative methodologies. Broadly, she is interested in how relationships between personal social networks, health behaviors, and health outcomes co-evolve over time, particularly in the context of disadvantage and inequality.
Disciplines: Sociology
Razo, Armando Political Science, College of Arts and Sciences / IUB
Bio: Professor Razo's research interests are in the field of comparative politics, with special interests in the political economy of development and comparative analysis of networks and institutions. His research and teaching center around two themes: (1) how political institutions in developing countries affect economic performance; and (2) the study of political institutions and political organization in nondemocratic settings. Current research projects include the development of an ontology and linguistic corpus for comparative analysis of networks in international development. He teaches courses on networks and institutions, quantitative contextual analysis, development, positive political economy, and Latin American politics. He is the author of Social Foundations of Limited Dictatorship, published by Stanford University Press in 2008, which advances a network theory of private policymaking. A student of economic history, he is also co-author with Stephen Haber and Noel Maurer of The Politics of Property Rights (2003).
Disciplines: Political Science
Shih, Patrick Informatics, School of Informatics and Computing / Bloomington
Bio: I'm an Assistant Professor of Informatics in the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University Bloomington. I am a Fellow of the Center for Computer-Mediated Communication (CCMC). I am also an affiliated faculty at the Center for the Integrative Study of Animal Behavior (CISAB), the Indiana University Network Science Institute (IUNI), and the Institute for Software Research (ISR) at the University of California, Irvine. I am interested in utilizing mixed methods approaches to tackle research problems in online and geographic communities. Specifically, my current research focuses on leveraging awareness of individual and community activities embedded in sensor technologies, smart devices, social media, and online forums in the design and construction of novel persuasive interfaces and civic engagement platforms that facilitate sustainable motivational and behavioral changes.
Smith, Eliot Psychological and Brain Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences / IUB
Bio: Distinguished Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences Eliot Smith has pioneered the development of multi-agent models of information spread in social networks that draw on social psychological studies of social influence to incorporate realistic assumptions about how and when people will accept (and further transmit) the information they receive from others (Mason et al., 2007). Smith’s empirical studies and multi-agent modeling have focused on the cognitive and behavioral processes that occur when people receive information from others that differs from their own prior beliefs — processes that determine whether they accept the information and change their beliefs, ignore the information, or seek out further evidence to attempt to reconcile the inconsistency (Collins et al., 2011; Smith and Collins, 2009). Another investigation examined in depth strategies for processing inconsistent information and determining its validity (Smith, 2014). The multi-agent model led to the conclusion that people can best avoid misinformation by comparing incoming information to their own existing beliefs, and discarding it if it is too discrepant. Alternative strategies that are prominent in the literature — such as accepting new information if it comes from multiple independent sources — were found not to be useful. This is partly because people are not usually in a good position to know the overall structure of the social network and therefore cannot tell whether multiple information sources are truly independent of each other. That is, person A may hear the same information from both B and C and assume they are independent, when in fact both B and C might have obtained the information from a common source D.